Business_news Photos of the hive that Karen Pence keeps at the vice president’s mansion draw attention to how important bees are

Business_news

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Sonny Perdue and his wife Mary joined Mrs. Karen Pence to unveil a bee hive on the Vice President’s residential grounds in Washington, D.C., June 6, 2017.

Preston Keres/USDA

  • Second Lady Karen Pence has been keeping some unexpected guests at the vice president’s official residence.
  • In 2017, the first beehive was installed at One Observatory Circle as part of the second lady’s commitment to the environmental benefits of thriving bee communities.
  • Visit business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

One Observatory Circle is the lesser-known official residence that has housed every vice president since 1974.

National Honey Bee Day 2019 marks just over two years after some unexpected guests moved into the official address, courtesy of second lady Karen Pence. Pence’s spokeswoman told INSIDER the second lady would not participate in this article.

Pence has touted the environmental benefits of successful beehives before. See how the buzzy creatures have made the vice president’s residence their home.

Business_news Welcome to Number One Observatory Circle, the vice president’s residence located a 15-minute drive from the White House in D.C.

The vice president’s residence at the Naval Observatory is where Vice President Al Gore is secluded awaiting developments in the presidential election Saturday Nov. 11, 2000 in Washington.

J Scott Applewhite/AP

Business_news Sitting on roughly 13 acres, the grounds have ample room to house many flowering plants — and the bees to pollinate them.


Matt Walter Facebook

Business_news In June 2017, Pence announced the arrival of the hives, which would house approximately 20,000 bees.

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Sonny Perdue and his wife Mary joined Mrs. Karen Pence to unveil a bee hive on the Vice President’s residential grounds in Washington, D.C., June 6, 2017.

Preston Keres/USDA