Business_news Photos show the world’s first solar road that’s turned out to be a colossal failure because it’s falling apart and doesn’t generate enough energy

Business_news

  • In July, a French daily newspaper published a story saying the longest solar road in the world had failed. It’s neither economically viable or energy efficient.
  • Less than three years since the road opened, it’s become cracked and damaged. Parts of the road have been demolished because they weren’t salvageable.
  • Energy targets were never hit, because engineers didn’t plan for rotting leaves to block sunlight. These photos show how
  • Visit business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

France appears to have been on the solar road to nowhere.

In July, the French daily newspaper Le Monde reported that the 0.6-mile solar road was a fiasco.

In December 2016, when the trial road was unveiled, the French Ministry of the Environment called it “unprecedented.” French officials said the road, made of photovoltaic panels, would generate electricity to power streetlights in Tourouvre, a local town.

But less than three years later, a report published by Global Construction Review says France’s road dream may be over. Cracks have appeared, and in 2018, part of the road had to be demolished due to damage from wear and tear.

Even at its peak, the road was only producing half of the expected energy, because engineers didn’t take into consideration rotting leaves falling on the road.

Here what the road looked like in all of its former glory, and how it got to this point.

Business_news It was all smiles and high hopes in 2016, when the world’s first solar panel road, called Wattway, opened. France spent $5.2 million on 0.6 miles of road, and 30,000 square feet of solar panels. It was hailed as the longest solar road in the world.

Segolene Royal at the inauguration of the solar panel road.

Benoit Tessier / Reuters

Business_news Despite grey skies on the day of the inauguration, France was leading the world for solar transportation.

An automobile drives on the solar panel road.

Benoit Tessier / Reuters

Business_news But the brake was never removed, and the wheels never started rolling — so to speak.

The tires of an automobile on a solar panel road.

Benoit Tessier / Reuters

Business_news It was a bold move beginning a solar panel trial in Normandy, France, since the region doesn’t have the most sunshine. Caen, a city in Normandy, only has 44 days of strong sunshine in a year. Thunderstorms also reportedly broke solar panels on the road.

Storm in Normandy.

Wikimedia

Business_news The trial road was meant to produce about 150,000 kWh a year, which is enough power to provide light for up to 5,000 people, every day. Instead, it was making just under 80,000 in 2018, and fewer than 40,000 by July 2019.

An electrical cabinet for Wattway on the solar road.

Benoit Tessier / Reuters

Business_news Colas, the company that built the road, said in 2016 that the solar panels were covered with resin containing sheets of silicon to make them capable of withstanding all traffic. But since the opening, panels have come loose or broken into little pieces.

A solar panel road is pictured during its inauguration in Tourouvre, Normandy

Benoit Tessier / Reuters

Business_news In May 2018, 300 feet of the road had to be demolished since it wasn’t salvageable.

A demolished solar panel.

Fabrizio Bensch / Reuters

electricity the panels could produce. They also didn't think about the pressure and weight from tractors, two locals told Le Monde." id="the-engineers-also-didnt-take-into-account-the-effects-of-leaves-which-caused-damage-and-limited-the-amount-of-electricity-the-panels-could-produce-they-also-didnt-think-about-the-pressure-and-weight-from-tractors-two-locals-told-le-monde-9">

Business_news The engineers also didn’t take into account the effects of leaves, which caused damage and limited the amount of electricity the panels could produce. They also didn’t think about the pressure and weight from tractors, two locals told Le Monde.

electricity the panels could produce. They also didn't think about the pressure and weight from tractors, two locals told Le Monde." data-class=" postload" data- data-src="https://amp.businessinsider.com/images/5d558dcfcd978464045c2537-750-563.jpg" data- data-title="">

A tractor in France.

Stephane Mahe / Reuters

market. "Our system is not mature on long distance traffic," he said. The company would focus on creating electricity for smaller things, like CCTV cameras and lighting bus shelters." id="and-now-the-trial-looks-like-its-all-over-wattways-managing-director-etienne-gaudin-told-le-monde-that-it-would-not-be-going-to-market-our-system-is-not-mature-on-long-distance-traffic-he-said-the-company-would-focus-on-creating-electricity-for-smaller-things-like-cctv-cameras-and-lighting-bus-shelters-10">

Business_news And now the trial looks like it’s all over. Wattway’s managing director Etienne Gaudin told Le Monde that it would not be going to market. “Our system is not mature on long distance traffic,” he said. The company would focus on creating electricity for smaller things, like CCTV cameras and lighting bus shelters.

market. " data-class=" postload" data- data-src="https://amp.businessinsider.com/images/5d55a698cd97847a4a6b3029-750-563.jpg" data- data-title="" distance="" electricity="" focus="" for="" he="" is="" lighting="" like="" long="" mature="" not="" on="" our="" said.="" shelters.="" smaller="" system="" the="" things="" traffic="" would="">

The car is parked.

Benoit Tessier / Reuters

More:

Features
News slideshow
Solar panel
Solar Road

Chevron icon
It indicates an expandable section or menu, or sometimes previous / next navigation options.


Close icon
Two crossed lines that form an ‘X’. It indicates a way to close an interaction, or dismiss a notification.



Check mark icon
A check mark. It indicates a confirmation of your intended interaction.